The Mask (1994) Review

The Mask is a 1994 American neo-noir hero parody movie coordinated by Charles Russell, delivered by Bob Engelman, and composed by Mike Werb, approximately dependent on the Mask funnies distributed by Dark Horse Comics.


The principal portion in the Mask establishment, it stars Jim Carrey, Peter Riegert, Peter Greene, Amy Yasbeck, Richard Jeni, and Cameron Diaz in her film debut.


Carrey plays Stanley Ipkiss, a hapless bank representative who finds a supernatural cover that changes him into a naughty miscreant with superpowers, yet who unintentionally becomes focused by the mafia when criminal Dorian Tyrell means to utilize the veil to oust his chief.

The film was delivered on July 29, 1994, by New Line Cinema, turning into a basic and business achievement. The film earned over $351 million on a $23 million spending plan, which made it the second most productive film dependent on a comic up to that point, behind Superman (1978).

It solidified Carrey's standing as a critical entertainer of the 1990s, and it set up Diaz as a main woman. Carrey was designated for a Golden Globe for his job, and the film was named for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects yet lost to Forrest Gump. An independent spin-off, Son of the Mask, was delivered in 2005.

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